FACT: FACT:

Advil® presents minimal cardiovascular risk1-3

Heart Heart

OTC IBUPROFEN HAS A FAVORABLE CARDIOVASCULAR SAFETY PROFILE3

Data from a series of publications suggest that OTC ibuprofen is not strongly associated with an increased risk of: 

  • Cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction [MI], stroke)1,2,4-9 
  • Cardio-renal events (high blood pressure, congestive heart failure)

However, multiple studies have found that taking ibuprofen or other NSAIDs at Rx doses over prolonged periods of time can increase the risk of developing cardiovascular events.10,11

ADVIL FOR PATIENTS ALREADY TAKING DAILY LOW-DOSE ASPIRIN

For patients already on, or for whom you are considering initiating, a cardioprotective aspirin regimen12

  • Taking ibuprofen at least a half hour after the dosing of immediate-release low-dose aspirin is a practical method to minimize potential impairment of the antiplatelet effect of aspirin
  • Because the effect of aspirin taken daily on platelets is long lasting, the occasional use of ibuprofen poses a minimal risk of attenuating the antiplatelet effect of low-dose aspirin

WHAT IS THE CV RISK ASSOCIATED WITH LOW-DOSE IBUPROFEN?

A cohort study that examined 4975 cases of acute MI and death from coronary heart disease showed the odds ratio for MI for ibuprofen at OTC doses was 1:06 (95% CI; 0.87 to 1.29). Prior history of coronary heart disease or concomitant intake of aspirin did not increase the risk of MI from ibuprofen.1

A case-controlled analysis performed to assess the risk of NSAIDs in relation to acute MI found that ibuprofen did not create an increased risk for MI.9

SAFETY INFORMATION FOR YOUR PATIENTS

NSAIDs, except aspirin, increase the risk of heart attack, heart failure, and stroke.  These can be fatal.  The risk is higher if you use more than directed or for longer than directed.

According to the Advil Drug Facts, patients should not use ibuprofen right before or after heart surgery. Patients are directed to ask a doctor before use if they have high blood pressure, heart disease, or have had a stroke.

Patients should stop use and ask a doctor if they have symptoms of heart problems or stroke including:

  • Chest pain
  • Trouble breathing
  • Weakness in one part or side of the body
  • Slurred speech
  • Leg swelling

To learn more about the label update for OTC non-aspirin NSAIDs, and its implications for your patients, click here.